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Bon

Member Since 25 Mar 2004
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Topics I've Started

Department of Agriculture announces CWD case

16 January 2017 - 11:04 AM

Department of Agriculture announces CWD case
 
Monday, January 16, 2017
 
HARRISBURG, PA
 
The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture announced Friday that a captive deer has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Pennsylvania. This is the first new case in a captive deer farm since 2014
.
The four-year-old white-tailed deer was harvested from a hunting preserve in Franklin County in November 2016. Samples from this deer tested positive for the disease at the Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory in Harrisburg. The test results were confirmed by the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa on Jan. 5. This deer was raised on a deer farm in Fulton County until it was sold to the Franklin County facility in August 2016. Both farms are under quarantine. The investigation continues and additional herds may be quarantined.
 
“We are working to minimize the risk to Pennsylvania’s deer herd by quarantining both farms and tracing any contacts with other deer in our efforts to find the source of CWD, if possible,” said Agriculture Secretary Russell C. Redding. “We want to stress that CWD is no danger to public health and has never been associated as a human health concern.”
 
There is no strong evidence that humans or livestock can contract Chronic Wasting Disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
Chronic Wasting Disease attacks the brain of infected deer, elk and moose, producing small lesions that eventually result in death. Animals can get the disease through direct contact with saliva, feces and urine from an infected animal.
 
Symptoms include weight loss, excessive salivation, increased drinking and urination, and abnormal behavior like stumbling, trembling and depression. Infected deer and elk also may allow unusually close approach by humans or natural predators. The disease is fatal and there is no known treatment or vaccine.
 
The first cases of CWD in Pennsylvania were detected when two Adams County deer tested positive for CWD in 2012. Surveillance for the disease has been ongoing in Pennsylvania since 1998.
The Department of Agriculture coordinates a mandatory surveillance program for more than 23,000 captive deer on 1,100 breeding farms, hobby farms and shooting preserves. Eleven captive deer have tested positive since 2012.
 
The Pennsylvania Game Commission collects samples from hunter-harvested deer and elk as well as those that appear sick or behave abnormally.
 
In areas where CWD has been detected in captive or free-ranging deer, the Pennsylvania Game Commission has responded by creating Disease Management Areas, within which special rules apply regarding the hunting and feeding of wild deer.
 
At this point, however, it is not yet known how this case will affect those who live or hunt in the area, said Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director R. Matthew Hough.
 
“Each hunting season we sample many of the deer harvested by hunters, both within our Disease Management Areas and elsewhere in the state, and within Disease Management Area 2, we test every known road-killed deer for CWD,” Hough said. “So far this year, positive CWD tests have come back regarding seven road-killed deer within DMA 2, but we await results from more than 3,000 samples from hunter-harvested deer.
 
“When all of those samples are returned, we will make our decision on how the boundaries of existing Disease Management Areas will change. At that time, we could implement special rules regarding the feeding and hunting of deer in parts of Franklin County where this new CWD case has been detected,” Hough said.
 
For more information, visit www.agriculture.pa.gov and search “Chronic Wasting Disease.”
 

Man charged with burglary in theft of puppy, canned spaghetti waives t

16 January 2017 - 10:45 AM

Man charged with burglary in theft of puppy, canned spaghetti waives to court
 
By Jeff Corcino jcorcino@theprogressnews.com  Jan 14, 2017 
 
Lloyd D. Bartlebaugh, 48, of Arcadia, who is accused of breaking into a home and stealing a puppy, $10 in cash, a can of Spaghetti-O’s with meatballs and a bag of microwave popcorn, had all charges bound over to court following a preliminary hearing on Wednesday before District Judge Richard Ireland.
 
Bartlebaugh is charged with burglary, criminal trespass-break into structure, misdemeanor theft by unlawful taking, misdemeanor receiving stolen property and summary criminal mischief.
 
Bartlebaugh’s attorney, Leanne Nedza of the public defender’s office, told the court that Bartlebaugh suffers from learning disabilities and questioned his competency to assist in his defense. She said she isn’t challenging his competency at the preliminary hearing stage but would be filing appropriate motions in the future.
 
 
State police Trooper John Bacher testified that, on Nov. 5, the victim reported that someone burglarized his home along Spruce Street in Burnside.
 
The rear door of the residence had been forced open and inside was missing a mixed-breed German Shepherd puppy worth $200, $10 in cash, a can of Chef-Boyardee Spaghetti-O’s with meatballs valued at $2, and a bag of microwave popcorn valued at $2.
 
The strike plate on the door was also damaged on the door; damage is estimated at $20.
 
The victim said he was told that Bartlebaugh was bragging that he had broken into his home and taken the dog and items.
 
Bacher then went to Bartlebaugh’s home in Burnside and saw the puppy tied up in the front yard. He spoke to the defendant’s niece, who said Bartlebaugh had taken the items and brought him an empty can of spaghetti O’s and meatballs.
 
 
Bacher spoke to Bartlebaugh on the front porch of his home and said Bartlebaugh appeared to be intoxicated.
 
State police Trooper Julie Clark testified she interviewed Bartlebaugh at the barracks and he told her he went to the post office and then to the victim’s home to deliver his mail. There was no one home but the dog came to him at the door. Bacher had said he learned Bartlebaugh used to own the dog but it was given to the victim a few weeks prior because he couldn’t take care of it properly.
 
Bartlebaugh said he then went home, but returned to the victim’s home. He used his shoulder to force open the back door and got the puppy. He said he took the popcorn and the can of Spaghetti-O’s off the kitchen table because his niece liked them.
 
Bartlebaugh is free on $10,000 unsecured bail.

Former Kansas player supports mom of 7-year-old fan who died

13 January 2017 - 02:45 PM

Former Kansas player supports mom of 7-year-old fan who died
 
By JESSE NEWELL The Kansas City Star 
 
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A field pass dangling from her right wrist, Shanda Hayden offered an apology as she posed for a photo with JaCorey Shepherd on the sidelines at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif.
 
"I'm sorry," she said. "I'm going to be taking a lot of pictures."
 
Hayden wrapped her arms around the San Francisco 49ers cornerback and beamed as her husband captured the moment on a cell phone. As an academic adviser for Kansas' football team, Hayden had been a mentor to Shepherd during his days as a Jayhawk from 2011-14, The Kansas City Star (http://bit.ly/2j8K1yY ) reports.
 
 
Now, two years later — during the most challenging time of Hayden's life — the roles were reversed.
 
Shepherd was coming through for her.
 
Shanda's 7-year-old son, Cole, died 22 days earlier, on Dec. 10. Cole had battled sarcoma, a rare childhood cancer, for months, going through countless rounds of painful chemotherapy as his diagnosis worsened. Still, as much as she and her husband, Steve, braced themselves, the pain of their son's death jarred them to a level they never could've prepared.
 
Functioning at home became difficult with reminders of Cole scattered throughout the house. Friends offered support but, really . what could they say?
 
Even a hastily planned getaway to Jamaica wasn't beneficial, as the hours spent in solitude on the beach gave them too much time to think and reflect.
 
"We didn't enjoy ourselves," Hayden said.
 
Their spirits raised almost as soon as they touched down in California the next week.
 
Shepherd made sure of it.
 
"It was the first time," Hayden said, "that we genuinely smiled since Dec. 10."
 
From the day Cole was admitted to the hospital back in May, football players went out of their way to show support.
 
Cole's parents were amazed by the effort.
 
Bringing particular joy was a message from the Seattle Seahawks' Tyler Lockett, who had been one of Cole's favorite players since the receiver's standout career at Kansas State — Steve's alma mater.
 
Moments after a practice in late November, Lockett filmed a video where he discussed that afternoon's workout before telling Cole to keep fighting.
 
Because of his treatments, Cole was unable to speak when his parents showed him the video. That didn't stop him from giving a thumbs up, letting everyone know how excited he was that the inspiration for his own No. 16 Seattle jersey had spoken directly to him.
 
KU coach David Beaty dedicated the team's season opener to Cole, and two months later, a group of Jayhawks football players — including captain Joe Dineen — gathered on the field after practice to shave each others' heads as a sign of support.
 
Through it all, no one has shown more kindness than Shepherd.
 
Ever since meeting Shanda in June of his freshman year in 2011, Shepherd felt a connection. He was a good student — Shanda joked that he "didn't require a lot of work" in that aspect — but he still stopped by her office to chat each day, whether it was about family, football or even his dating life.
 
"We just started getting closer," Shepherd said. "I felt comfortable opening up to her."
 
Shepherd didn't abandon the friendship after his first two seasons in the NFL. He called Shanda on her birthday two days after Cole's death, inviting her and Steve out for the 49ers' final game on Jan. 1. He insisted on covering all of the expenses for the trip.
 
Though hesitant at first, Shanda decided it was something she needed to move forward. KU football sports information director Katy Lonergan set up an itinerary, and when Beaty learned of the upcoming outing, he provided additional money.
 
More surprises awaited the Haydens when they arrived in Santa Clara. One evening they drove 40 miles to Alameda to visit Heeney. Sitting in his home, Heeney told them about a pair of cleats he'd made earlier that season in honor of Cole.
 
The design included phrases like "#TeamCole" and "Cure Sarcoma" and also featured a gold ribbon for childhood cancer awareness.
 
Heeney, who had worn the shoes in a game, presented them to Shanda and Steve.
 
Shepherd coordinated the rest.
 
He invited the Haydens to 49ers practice on Saturday and introduced them to then-coach Chip Kelly, who said he'd heard a lot about them.
 
Shepherd also took Steve and Shanda to the NFL Team Shop to buy personalized No. 38 jerseys so they could match him on game day before joining them on a tour of the 49ers hall of fame — a place even he hadn't been.
 
The following day, Shepherd presented the family with one final memento.
 
 
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He'd previously done offseason training in Texas with Seattle quarterback Trevone Boykin, and earlier in the week, he'd contacted Boykin about Steve and Shanda's situation — and about their upcoming visit.
 
After Boykin took the final snap in Seattle's 25-23 victory, he found Shepherd on the field and asked where his friends were sitting. Though Shanda and Steve had already left their seats, Shepherd completed the delivery when he rejoined the couple a few hours later after the game: Boykin, it turned out, wanted them to have the Seattle game ball.
 
The Haydens went back to Mass at Sacred Heart Church in Ottawa last week, a tough step considering the anger and sadness that remain.
 
Cole received first communion in the hospital. He attended Catholic school, and one day he turned to Steve during a conversation on the ride home.
 
"I want to give my life to Jesus, just like Father Bill," he said.
 
The story brought Priest Bill Fisher to tears as he retold it during Cole's memorial service last month.
 
Shanda and Steve made Cole part of their 49ers trip as well. While on the sidelines, they unfurled their son's Lockett jersey, holding it up for a photo they believed was important.
 
Shanda later posted the image on her Twitter account.
 
"We know you're here with us sweet angel," she wrote.
 
A week later, Shanda described the trip as "great therapy" for her and her husband.
 
"It helped us kick off the new year thinking about things differently now, what our new path looks like," Shanda said. "It was nice to spend time with (JaCorey and Ben) and laugh and smile a little bit and know that it's OK to do that."
 
Though Shanda has previously been careful with what she's shared on social media — knowing many athletes wouldn't want their generosity publicized — she has started to see things differently in the past few weeks.
 
While many people only see the athlete side of their favorite players, Shanda has experienced the human side.
 
And, when it comes to people like Shepherd, she says the latter is most impressive.
 
"Sometimes you don't expect boys to do those sort of things," Shanda said. "They really are family. That's what it really feels like."

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE

09 January 2017 - 04:37 PM

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
 

WARREN-MCKEAN-ELK-CAMERON-CLEARFIELD-CAMBRIA-BLAIR-HUNTINGDON-MIFFLIN-JUNIATA-PERRY-DAUPHIN-LEBANON-241 PM EST MON JAN 9 2017

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 10 AM TO 7 PM EST
TUESDAY...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN STATE COLLEGE HAS ISSUED A WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY FOR LIGHT SLEET AND FREEZING RAIN...WHICH IS IN EFFECT FROM 10 AM TO 7 PM EST TUESDAY.


* HAZARD TYPES...MIXED SLEET AND FREEZING RAIN. SOME AREAS WILL SEE A BRIEF PERIOD OF LIGHT SNOW TUESDAY MORNING.

* SNOW ACCUMULATIONS...A COATING TO TWO INCHES OF SNOW NORTH OF INTERSTATE 80...AND LESS THAN ONE INCH OF SNOW SOUTH OF INTERSTATE 80.

* ICE ACCUMULATIONS...UP TO A TENTH OF AN INCH OF SLEET AND
FREEZING RAIN...ESPECIALLY NORTH OF INTERSTATE 80.

* TIMING...A PERIOD OF LIGHT SNOW WILL ARRIVE EARLY TO MID
MORNING...CHANGING TO FREEZING RAIN AND SLEET BY AFTERNOON.

* IMPACTS...ICE AND SNOW ACCUMULATIONS MAY CREATE SLIPPERY ROAD CONDITIONS.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

THE PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REMINDS MOTORISTS TO ADJUST SPEEDS BASED ON DRIVING CONDITIONS AND TO TAKE IT SLOW IN ICE AND SNOW.

 


DETOUR COMING AS BUILDING CONSTRUCTION BEGINS IN ST MARYS

09 January 2017 - 02:03 PM

DETOUR COMING AS BUILDING CONSTRUCTION BEGINS IN ST MARYS

01/09/2017

 

St Marys, PA - A road closure and detour will begin Wednesday, January 18 as construction work starts at the SGL facility in St. Marys, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT).

 
Theresia Street (Route 1005) will be closed from Speer Street to Hall Avenue and drivers will be detoured around the closure using Speer Street and Hall Avenue (Route 1007).
 
Work hours are 7 A.M. to 4 P.M. each weekday but the road closure and detour will be in effect 24-hours-a-day, 7 days-a-week. Construction is scheduled to last through May 18, with the closure and detour expected to be in effect during that time.
 
Detour signing will be in place. Drivers are reminded to obey posted speed limits, follow official detour signs, and always buckle up.